google.com, pub-7401350658812701, DIRECT, f08c47fec0942fa0 USS Oklahoma City CLG5 CG5 CL91 SSN723


USS Oklahoma City
New logo courtesy of Glenn Stone, MS2 (SS) 86-89


Combat Action Ribbon
Navy Unit Citation Meritorious Unit Citation National Defense Service Medal Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
VietNam Service Medal Humanitarian Service Medal of Valor with Palm Viet Nam Campaign Medal
Signal Light courtesy of Phil Gerini
CLG-5  Silhouette courtesy of Phil Gerinisub silhouette courtesy of Phil Gerini

Submitted by Phil Gerini OKC Patch CG-5 Patch OKC Patch courtesy of Ross De Paola 723oldpatch First Fleet Patch courtesy of Phil Gerini
SSN-723 7th Fleet VN patch courtesy of Kenneth Pounders 7th Fleet logo contributed by 
Len Buonaiuto Com7Flt patch courtesy of Ross De Paola Yacht Club ComCruDesFlot-9 patch courtesy of Phil Gerini


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Dedicated to the brave men who served aboard
the USS Oklahoma City CL-91, CLG-5, CG-5 and SSN-723.


USS Oklahoma City
Shipmates Found To Date

1384

If you served aboard any of the ships named
USS Oklahoma City please enter your name
and other information into the Deck Log database.



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Joe Caruso's OK City News Notes


Plebes First Day At The U.S. Naval Academy

Go to the Video Archive to see it


Veterans Statistics from the Vietnam Memorial Wall

There are 58,267 names now listed on that polished black wall, including those added in 2010.

The names are arranged in the order in which they were taken from us by date and within each date the names are alphabetized. It is hard to believe it is 63 years since the first casualty.

The first known casualty was Richard B. Fitzgibbon, of North Weymouth , Mass. Listed by the U.S. Department of Defense as having been killed on June 8, 1956. His name is listed on the Wall with that of his son, Marine Corps LCpl Richard B. Fitzgibbon III, who was killed on Sept. 7, 1965.

There are three sets of fathers and sons on the Wall.

39,996 on the Wall were just 22 or younger, 8,283 were just 19 years old. The largest age group, 33,103 were 18 years old. 12 soldiers on the Wall were 17 years old. 5 soldiers on the Wall were 16 years old. One soldier, PFC Dan Bullock was 15 years old.

997 soldiers were killed on their first day in Vietnam . 1,448 soldiers were killed on their last day in Vietnam .

31 sets of brothers are on the Wall. Thirty one sets of parents lost two of their sons.

54 soldiers attended Thomas Edison High School in Philadelphia . 8 women are on the Wall, nursing the wounded.

244 soldiers were awarded the Medal of Honor during the Vietnam War; 153 of them are on the Wall

Beallsville, Ohio with a population of 475 lost 6 of her sons. West Virginia had the highest casualty rate per capita in the nation. There are 711 West Virginians on the Wall.

The most casualty deaths for a single day was on January 31, 1968 ~ 245 deaths. The most casualty deaths for a single month was May 1968 - 2,415 casualties were incurred.

For most Americans who read this they will only see the numbers that the Vietnam War created. To those who survived the war, and to the families of those who did not, we see the faces, we feel the pain that these numbers created We are, until we too pass away, haunted with these numbers, because they were our friends, fathers, husbands, wives, sons and daughters There are no noble wars, just noble warriors.




For information on Mesothelioma, go to the Veterans page.



KIRCHGESLER, Kenneth, OSCS 70-74.

My husband served on OKC from June 70- May 74. He passed in April of this year and thanks to the Navy and 2 HM's his ashes are on their way to Guam to be placed in the ocean with the OKC by the OKC.

Diane Kirchgesler.


Editorial

The following article is reprinted from the Spring/Summer 2019 issue of The OKC Corral. The rebuttal appears below.

The web page the Association is part of is privately owned and maintained by a former crew-member. Up to now, it has been a successful tool to get the word out about our reunions and other information relative to the ship and her crews.

However, the owner has been dealing with medical issues over the past few years and the web page has not been updated or maintained for some time. It is necessary for the Association to maintain a positive presence a good public image for it to be successful and the current web page does not meet these criteria.

As such, the Association will be developing a new web page to be owned by the Association and dedicated solely to it. This will take some time, so please be patient.



Rebuttal

First of all, the Association is not, and never has been, part of my web page. After some initial inquiries back in 1997, about publishing a crew directory, I was turned away by the Association. They were not willing to share their extensive list of thirty or forty names that they had amassed.

Second, when I started to attract hundreds and hundreds of former crew members, the Association felt compelled to write about the success of my website. And just as in the editorial above, they referred to the page without mentioning the author.

Far more than a directory, it became an archive of memories about the U.S.S. Oklahoma City vessels. I spent more than twenty years and most of my free time writing, editing and publishing the site, all at my own expense, with no funds from the Association. The bulk of my information came from other crew-members and their loved ones who wanted to be a part of something that recalled a pivotal time in their lives.

The only reason that the page slowed was that the Association directed all their efforts to social media. For the past five years, I have had no cooperation from the Association; no photos, no descriptions, no stories, nothing. The only thing I got was the reunion announcement, which was constantly being corrected and updated. And the president of the Association insisted that I make all the changes on demand, whenever he found another error in his own copy. It was interesting that I received this information only after it was sent out by email to everyone else.

As for maintaining a positive presence, my site is an ARCHIVE. It is meant as a reference tool for like minded individuals. The president of the Association is entitled to his own opinion. But he is not entitled to his own facts, which is why I felt the need to set the record straight. Perhaps the Association should give up the quest for another website in favor of a search for another president.



What You Need to Know About the
Blue Water Navy Benefits Law

Veterans with one of 14 diseases presumed to be related to the herbicide Agent Orange and who served offshore or in the specified areas of the DMZ, can now file a disability claim with the Department of Veterans to receive benefits, thanks to a law enacted June 25.

H.R. 299 extends disability compensation to personnel who served off the coast of the Republic of Vietnam between Jan. 9, 1962, and May 7, 1975. It specifies that veterans must have served on a ship not more than 12 nautical miles off the coast. The expanse of territorial water covered begins on the southwestern demarcation line of Vietnam and Cambodia and runs through several points spelled out in the law.

According to Congress and the Department of Veterans Affairs, an estimated 90,000 veterans may be eligible for benefits under the law. Those eligible include veterans with one or more of the presumptive diseases whose claims were previously denied. It also includes those with new claims.

If a veteran is not sure where their vessel was located, but they have one of the associated diseases, they should file a claim anyway -- and do it as soon as possible, according to John Wells, an attorney with Military-Veterans Advocacy.

Information on how to file a VA claim for Agent Orange exposure is available on the department's website here.

If a veteran has previously been denied and need help appealing their claim, can get assistance from an accredited veterans service organization here.

Help is also available through the National Veterans Legal Services Program by email, bluewater2019@nvlsp.org or by phone, 855-333-0677.

Thanks to Roque Gonzalez, USMC 72-74, a frequent contributor to this page.




Mighty Mo Stamp

U.S.S. Missouri Commemorative Stamp available in June



2019 Reunion Information

Now Available HERE



New To The Crew


DUTHIE, Gary Enumclaw, WA, 76-78 mail
*** BMSN - Now a writer and married with two teenage daughters.

IRVIN, Larry R, Griffith, IN, 61-62, RM3 mail

From March ’61 to December ’61, we did some shakedown sailing up and down the West Coast before taking off for deployment in Yokosuka, JP. We left Long Beach, CA, 12/01/61 for Pearl Harbor to commemorate the Gold Star Mothers on 12/07/61 . Upon stops in the Philippines and Okinawa, we arrived in Yokosuka on December 24, 1961 and 5 days later became Flagship 7th Fleet for 6 months. Enroute, through a typhoon, a ‘man overboard’ call came in from a Japanese ‘Maru’ but couldn’t stay searching as the waves were just too high. Coincidentally, upon joining the Ok City Radio Divn., there were 3 other Larry’s …. One 1st Class from Walnut Grove, CA, 2 other Seamen from Lincoln, NE and Cheyenne, WY . As in most places, we all had some sort of ‘nickname’ or were called by your ‘last’ name. Two years ago I found one of the Larry’s in Utah and my wife and I made a visit with them. Another Larry along with 4 others that have been OK City shipmates, (of which one is married to a lady with my last name but we can’t find a family connection) have been email friends for awhile.

Married for 55 years to a beautiful woman from Louisville, KY (without an accent). With a Son, 51 and a Daughter, 48, born on my birthdate, 9/25 . Four Grandchildren ages 26, 17, 15 and 13 (only girl). Lived in Whiting, IN my 1st year with my Grandparents while my Father was still in the Navy aboard the USS Pennsylvania as a Chief Gunners Mate/Warrant Officer; he was discharged summer of 1945 and passed 1991. Wife retired from UTLX in E. Chicago, IN after 34 years and I retired in 2006 from my 9th career (lol) ; C&EI railroad accounting, Brady Motorfreight Terminal Clerk/Dispatcher/Terminal Mgr., Wills Trucking & Long Rock dry bulk hauling dispatcher/7 states Sales Mgr., The Budd Co.transportation/traffic clerk, Humana Healthcare-Medicare Divn. Sales/Sales Mgr., RollinOn RV Salesman, Blue Chip Casino/ Casino Guest Services Supvr. and last but not least, a Real Estate Title Co. as Assn’t Closing person. All without a ‘college degree’ but a ‘gift for gab’.

Today and everyday, my wife and I have a varied life with various things to do, usually depending upon the time of year and the weather. I used to golf with a bunch of guys but the group is either slowing down or have passed. In the fall though, my son and I bowl in a mixed league of 22 teams in which I have been a member for about 25 years. This has been a memory lane for me and hope it is as complete as warranted .

HINES, Marion Eugene (Gene) 73-76, mail
I was in R division under Chief Houk. Chuck Nagle is the one who told me about the Oklahoma City in A school. I was friends with Michael and Patrick Varland of R division.

HEINDSELMAN, Bob, Peoria, IL 67-69 mail
I was a CYN assigned to Comseventhflt staff. I was on the USS Providence and then transferred to the USS Oklahoma City. I was attached to Comseventhflt staff from 1967 to 1969. I know Tom Lamson and Billy Johnstone. I know there are others but can't remember all of their names.

NEFF, John P 71-75 mail

WHEELUS, Thomas Hugo, OK, 70-73 mail
SK2 -Supply, Anti swimmers watch, DC party amidship main deck. Now retired

BROWNING, Randy Lexington, SC, 87-90 & 95-98 mail
YN1 - Leading Yeoman - Ken Montgomery was my best buddy. Retired as Chief Yeoman (Submarines) in January 2007 and have been working as an HR Consult with Paychex ever since.

WARREN, Troy M III Palmetto, FL, 78-79 mail
QM2 -I swapped over to the OKC from the USS Ouellet as a QM3. I made QM2 while onboard. I was there in 1978 - 79. Almost crossed deck to the Blue Ridge in Yoko but realized I was sailing on a piece history, so I rode her back to the US for decommissioning. It was bittersweet. I got out of the Navy and went in the Merchant Marine. I sailed another 35 years and retired as second officer.

JURY, Len "Doc J" 68-70 mail
***HM2 Came on board in San Diego after completion of OR School, just prior to WestPac Deployment, Held daily sickcall, Ran the Operating Room, and did minor surgeries.

FRIESE, Mark, Lisbon, CT 85-88 #1375 mail
*** STS1/SS Plankowner
^^^ Great crew. We used to have some wicked basketball games over at Huntington Hall. Jason Breen, Patrick Milan, Lee B. Thompson were my running mates in addition to all of the sonar gang. Went on to make Chief in 1988, end up as an ACINT Rider. Retired in 2002. Became a math teacher and am currently the principal of Stonington High School in CT. Loving life.



TAPS

Cleveland Jay Voiers
CLEVELAND JAY VOIERS, YN3 (74-74), age 70, passed away on Tuesday, February 19, 2019
Obituary


Darrell Streeter
DARREL VERDON STREETER FTGC (71-73), age 77, passed away on March 29, 2015
Obituary




Robert Condon photo


Read more about this OK City Hero



SSN-723 Westpac Cruise 2004
Photographed & Compiled by
Shipmate Todd Selby, MMC(SS) 03-05


SSN723 Westpac Cruise 2004
Click on the link below to see all the photos from the cruise. Allow from one to five minutes for the pictures to load. When you see the green arrow in the upper right hand corner, click on that to start the show.
Slide Show





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The USS Oklahoma City website is published daily for the benefit of the crew members of all ships named Oklahoma City. Editor and Publisher: Joe Caruso; Graphics Editors: Phil Gerini, Glenn Stone; Editorial Contributors: Jack Kemejuk, John Baker, Paul Dillon, Frank Zacarro, T.C. Lamson, Jim Blackburn, Robert Britton, Richard Harvey, & John Cruso. All rights reserved. Copyright 1997 to 2019.


Your Webmaster is ETN-3 Joe Caruso, 1969

1997-2019 Joseph L. Caruso webmaster@ussokcity.com
No animals were harmed during the production of this website.



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